July 25, 2017

Toadstools in Turf

toadstools

Toadstools in Turf

I’ve more than a passing fascination with fungi  and at this time of year they can be hard to escape – they’re literally popping up everywhere and often causing a lot of distress, especially to those lawn-loving gardeners or when they suddenly appear  in a newly mulched flower border.  So if your life is suddenly full of scatterings of little toadstools, what should you do?

If  the toadstools have appeared in beds and borders, as long as the plants are all OK, then no need to panic: The toadstools are pretty definitely living on organic debris, and they LOVE mulch be it well-rotted manure, garden compost or wood chip and bark chip mulches. These sort of fungi rarely pose a threat to living plants, they’re what is known as saprophytic and feed on already dead material, Nature’s breaker-downers and totally harmless to your beloved shrubs or perennials.

If there are scattered areas or straight-ish lines of toadstools on your lawn then again, no need to worry about the lawn’s health, these too will be living on dead matter. They are often encouraged by a build up of ‘thatch’ (dead grass clippings and other organic debris) or by the presence of dead tree or shrub roots beneath the grass – these are the ones which generally follow a straight-ish line ie the route of the root! Improving lawn maintenance eg by collecting up clippings when you mow, scarifying and aerating usually reduces problems with the randomly scattered toadstools. With those growing from dead roots the best solution is to do some excavations! Use a sharp spade to  cut a line close to the line of toadstools, dig out the dead root, fill the area with fresh soil (so you don’t end up with a line of subsidence) and fold back the turf. Panic over!

Toadstools in Fairy Ring

Sadly, fairy rings as they are known, are virtually impossible to control unless you are prepared to move many cubic metres of soil, so I say just wait until the ring expands so much that it reaches the edge of the lawn….then it should die out naturally!

About The Author

Profile photo of Pippa

With a BSc in Botany and a further degree specializing in protecting plants from pests and diseases Pippa spent 11 years working for The Royal Horticultural Society at their garden in Wisley, advising gardeners about their gardening problems. More recently Pippa has become a well-loved and respected TV and Radio broadcaster and a prolific writer, with a host of best-selling gardening books to her name. Pippa regularly gives gardening talks and lectures, worked as the horticultural consultant for the ITV murder mystery series 'Rosemary and Thyme' and in 2007 was awarded an honorary Doctorate.

Related posts

Leave a Reply